Local schist features in this dramatic Condon Architects home.

Simon Devitt

Local schist features in this dramatic Condon Architects home.

Along with the architecture of a home, its skin has a massive design impact.

Check out these diverse – and sometimes surprising – cladding solutions.

1. Schist – Condon Architects

Featuring local schist and looking to Lake Wanaka and Treble Cone ski fields, this gable-roofed home is fully immersed in its scenery.

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2. Saying it with steel – Higham Architecture

Black Colorsteel Endura frames the sides of this Higham Architecture home.

Marina Matthews

Black Colorsteel Endura frames the sides of this Higham Architecture home.

A dramatic floating roof extends over the garage of this new home. But the black Colorsteel Endura also frames the sides to form the entranceway walkway, as well as being used as the cladding on the upper storey.

3. Corten steel – Zack/de Vito Architecture

Corten steel creates a welcome contrast to the wooden materials.

Cesar Rubio

Corten steel creates a welcome contrast to the wooden materials.

In contrast to the wood box that contains the public spaces of this home, the private wing is clad in Corten steel. Both materials show a sensitivity to the surrounding landscape, which is dry and brown much of the year.

4. Textured stainless steel – David Jameson Architect

This unique home was built tough with <a href=textured stainless steel.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Paul Warchol

This unique home was built tough with textured stainless steel.

A tree fell on the owner’s previous home, so on this one he wasn’t taking any chances, with the strong replacement home clad in part in textured stainless steel.

5. Cedar + zinc (and a smidge of yellow) – Box Build

Zinc metal sheets have also been used in the interiors to define living zones.

Sophie Heyworth

Zinc metal sheets have also been used in the interiors to define living zones.

The cladding on this home also defines its interiors – the ground floor, clad in interlocking zinc metal sheets, contains all the living zones. Upstairs, the cedar box has three bedrooms and a master suite.

6. Raw cedar (and a touch of red) – South Architects

Raw cedar helps to create a layered look.

Jamie Armstrong

Raw cedar helps to create a layered look.

Cedar’s allure goes beyond the cladding here – each time the outer cedar skin is cut it exposes an inner layer of darker cedar cladding. This “layer” continues inside to create a dark interior backdrop for art.

7. Painted cedar – Dalman Architects

This seaside home makes the most of durable materials.

Stephen Goodenough

This seaside home makes the most of durable materials.

Materials are durable by necessity for this seaside home, utilising colour-coated aluminium roofing, painted cedar vertical boards, powder-coated aluminium joinery, and stainless-steel fittings.

8. Charred larch – Urbanfunction

Burnt larch cladding allows the spectacular scenery to be the main focus.

Stephen Entwisle

Burnt larch cladding allows the spectacular scenery to be the main focus.

All fired up about your cladding? This modest home with spectacular outlooks benefits from burnt larch cladding by Chartek. Indoors, the look is also black, letting the scenery pop.

9. Concrete + steel – David Reid Homes

A modern European style is reflected through the balance of concrete and steel in this David Reid home.

Kallan Macleod

A modern European style is reflected through the balance of concrete and steel in this David Reid home.

Much of the exterior of this home is in dark-toned precast concrete panels for a sense of solidity. The balance of cladding is standing seam, Euro-tray style metal to both roof and walls, as in the modern European style.

10. Concrete – AO Architecture

This home’s rugged concrete construction fits in well with the outdoor environment.

Simon Larkin

This home’s rugged concrete construction fits in well with the outdoor environment.

Butted up against a basalt cliff face, this home responds with rugged board-formed concrete construction that doubles as the cladding. Inside, family and guests are given close up reminders of the setting.

See more cladding ideas and inspiration here.

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